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Overlooked, Underrated, Forgotten 7

The past is a foreign country, all right, but it’s chock full of great SF&F titles to get us through Corona Days. Here are the latest offerings from the Aurealis Editors, complete with our pithy teasers.

  • Overlooked: Darkfall by Isobelle Carmody (1997). Immersive, transfixing, interwoven.
  • Underrated: The Three Stigmata of Palmer Eldritch by Philip K. Dick (1965). Unsettling, bleak, hallucinatory.
  • Forgotten: Out of the Silence by Erle Cox (1925). Ground-breaking, best-selling, Australian.
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Overlooked, Underrated, Forgotten 6

What better time to read? And, as such, Aurealis is continuing our deep dive into the SF/Fantasy of the past, those books that have been sitting at the back of bookshelves for ages awaiting a re-read. Why not these give a try?

  • Overlooked: The Prestige by Christopher Priest, 1995 . Imaginative, intelligent, gripping .
  • Underrated: Star Gate by Andre Norton, 1958. Engaging, robust, brisk.
  • Forgotten: The Devil’s Elixirs by E T A Hoffmann, 1815 in German, 2009 Oneworld Classics English translation. Macabre, disorienting, labyrinthine.
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Overlooked, Underrated, Forgotten 4

Here are some more Aurealis reading suggestions, goodies from the past, perfect for pandemic reading – or re-reading. Some of these might take some finding, but they’re well worth it.

  • Overlooked: Wormwood by Terry Dowling (1991). Entertaining, Enthralling, Dowlingesqe.
  • Underrated: Deryni Rising, by Katherine Kurtz (1970). Thoughtful, deliberate, intricate.
  • Forgotten: The Sea and Summer by George Turner (1987). Prescient, incisive, Australian.
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Overlooked, Underrated, Forgotten 3

Imposing Aurealis HQ is in Melbourne, Victoria, and we’re in full-on lockdown now, so quality reading is more important than ever. Here’s our next instalment in trawling the past to bring you books that you may have overlooked, others may have underrated, and we all may have forgotten.

  • Overlooked: The Luck of Brin’s Five, by Cherry Wilder (1977). Rich, detailed, knotty.
  • Underrated: Alamut by Vladimir Bartol, (1938 in Slovenian; 2004 in English). Unsettling, mesmerising, profound
  • Forgotten: Winter’s Tale, by Mark Helprin (1983). Inventive, imaginative thoughtful.
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Overlooked, Underrated, Forgotten 2

In our efforts to suggest titles for your CovidDays reading, here are three more books you may not have considered, along with our customarily pithy three word teasers:

Overlooked: The Book of Skulls by Robert Silverberg (1972) – disturbing, absorbing, unique.

Underrated: Ubik, by Philip K. Dick (1969) – quirky, entertaining, phildickian.

Forgotten: Synners by Pat Cadigan (1991) – punchy, dense, trenchant.

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Overlooked, Underrated, Forgotten

To help everyone find some good SF&F reads in these straitened times, the Aurealis editors will be offering an irregular series of ‘Overlooked, Underrated and Forgotten’ titles for your attention.
Here are our three for today:
Overlooked Replay by Ken Grimwood (1986). Poignant, thought-provoking, life-changing.
Underrated The Anubis Gates by Tim Powers ( 1983). Rollicking, twisty, entertaining.
Forgotten The Long Tomorrow by Leigh Brackett ( 1955). Moving, powerful, sensitive.

Contributions welcome for the threefold ‘Overlooked, Underrated and Forgotten’ list – and don’t forget your three word teasers!

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The 16 best science fiction books of all time

Isabel Cabrera created and supplied this wondrous graphic. She says:

‘With the recent success of Annihilation and Ad Astra, science fiction films are proving to be as popular as ever.

And most of the great science fiction films of the past three decades were actually based on epic science fiction books, including The Martian and Blade Runner (based on the book Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep).

To help celebrate National Science Fiction Day held on January 2 each year, Global English Editing rounded up the best sci-fi novels that deserve a spot on your bookshelf.

From Dune and its intergalactic messiah, to the earth’s final survivor in The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy, to the iconic Frankenstein, this list features the best science fiction books from the past 200 years. 

Over this time, science fiction has created some of the most profound, compelling and popular novels ever written. 

The key theme connecting the best of these books is how emotional and primal humans fare in the face of the powerful scientific advances they create. So, although sci-fi delves into the unknown, the stories aren’t pure fantasy: they exist in settings in some way connected to our own human experience.’

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Aurealis is looking for New Zealand SFF books to review

Are you a New Zealander? Have you published or self-published a science fiction, fantasy or horror book in the last year?

Aurealis would like to consider your book for review in its all-New Zealand issue to be published at CoNZealand. Send eBooks only in both epub and mobi format to reviews@aurealis.com.au with the subject line: Ebook for NZ special issue by 31 March 2020 at the latest.

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The 2019 Aurealis Round-up!

Now that the last issue of Aurealis for 2019 has been published, here’s the Big List of all this year’s stories:
The Moonstone in the Dust by Carolyn Hine
The Excuses We Make For Our Children by Rebecca Fung
In the Mountain Valley by Gordon Grice
Of Roses and Electric Shock by Joshua Caleb Wilson
Tales of the Flame by Dirk Strasser
Getting Home by P.K. Torrens
Renascent by Pauline Yates
Leisure Culture by Maddison Stoff
Drink with the Dead by Craig Blane
Marked for Life by J.R. Schuyler
The Moth Tapes by Joseph Ashley-Smith
Ogali by Nuzo Onoh
Abomination by Michelle Birkette
To Hell and Back by Michael Pryor
The Stranger of Morden by Mike Adamson
Serine by Shane Drury
Wreck Diving by Joanne Anderton
Nie among the Tree People by Emma Mann
The Witch who Wove Dreams by Mike Adamson
Cradle by Stephen Higgins
She Sells Sea-Hells by the C Door by Eric Del Carlo
Dog Nebula by Subo Wijeyeratne
Fracture Line by Chris Walker
Timbuktu by Gerri Brightwell
Club Fiends by Paul Alex Gray
Tigers of Mars by Conor DiViesti
Big Heart by Lynn Wohlwend
Inheritance by James Rowland
Data by Laurence Barratt-Manning
Flesh of the Other by Eric Del Carlo

We’ve published stories from Australia, New Zealand, Japan, UK, Canada and USA and it’s been an abundance of riches. You can still get all 2019 issues by subscribing at aurealis.com.au.

And stay tuned! 2020 is going to be bigger and better than ever in the Aurealis universe!

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Aurealis is looking for non-fiction

Got an idea for a non-fiction article? Not sure if it will work. Send Aurealis an email and tell us. Maybe you’ve lined up an author interview, been watching trends in speculative fiction, seen something in science that spec fiction readers will find interesting, got something you just need to get off your chest.

In the last few years, Aurealis has published articles on the history of spec fiction in Australia, monsters, interstellar warfare, utopia, AfroSF, Kafka, artificial wombs, robotics, world-building, HP Lovecraft, non-violent SF—and lots of interviews and more.

We are interested in articles between 500 and 2000 words of interest to readers and writers of science fiction, fantasy and horror.. These include humorous pieces, serious articles and interviews. We prefer non-fiction where some visuals are included. Non-fiction must be previously unpublished and remain unpublished for 12 months after publication in Aurealis. Our payment is A$20 per 1000 words. Send all non-fiction articles and queries to nonfiction@aurealis.com.au.